Martin Knight MD FRCS MBBS

The Spinal Foundation

Mr Knight trained in London and is an internationally acknowledged leader in Endoscopic Minimal Invasive Lumbar Spine Surgery (EMISS).

He has pioneered aware state spinal diagnosis, spinal endoscopic equipment and techniques including Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Decompression & Foraminoplasty (TELDF), Laser Disc Decompression and Endoscopic Intradiscal, Annuloplasty, Combination EMISS and polymer disc reconstruction, Endoscopic Interlaminar Lumbar Decompression and has a particular interest in treating Cluneal Nerve pain.

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Cluneal Nerve Diagnosis and a Radiofrequency Treatment Protocol

A Prospective review of 41 patients with combinations of back, buttock and pseudo-sciatic pain. In 33 Cluneal Nerve Irritation was causal as diagnosed with therapeutic injections. Further treatment with postural correction and radiofrequency ablation achieved a successful outcome in 26/28 patients reviewed at 12 – 48 months.

EVEN MORE SEMINARS

  • Prof Jenny Freeman: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Prof Jenny Freeman
    University of Plymouth

    Balance and falls in neurological conditions- what does the evidence tell us?

  • Prof Jenny Freeman: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Prof Jenny Freeman
    University of Plymouth

    Professional Development CPD Café

  • Clare Belmont and Jo Heath: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Clare Belmont and Jo Heath
    Frenchay Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre, The Huntercombe Group

    Supporting patients with complex physical impairments following brain injury

  • Philippe AUVRAY: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Philippe AUVRAY
    NEURALLYS

    Ambulatory Intracranial pressure monitoring: a revolution for shunted patients and neurosurgeons

  • Professor Gus A Baker: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Professor Gus A Baker
    Tribune Neuropsychology Services, University of Liverpool, Walton Centre for Neurology& Neurosurgery

    The additional burden of epilepsy: a psychological and neuropsychological perspective